Wednesday, April 7, 2010

Kettlebell Snatches and Your Hands

A couple of weeks ago, my friend Matt and I were working with his brand new girevoy sport competition kettlebell. It had been a while since I had picked up a competition bell... The thinner handle is, without a doubt, much easier on the grip and it is also, without a doubt, harder on the hands.

The basic technique is the same with a larger handle, however, on a competition bell the smaller surface area of the handle leaves less room for error - if you don't catch it right and fail to follow the bell on the backswing, you will punish your mitts.

Denis Kanygin has a nice video covering "Preventing Blisters". Enjoy.

11 comments:

Boris T. said...

Denis is a good person to learn from. Tonnes of useful info.

Boris said...

Agreed, solid stuff.

matt said...

Nice video Boris. I will give it a try. I am getting close to retiring from the snatch because of all of the blisters. I cant seem to get the hang of the smaller handle.

Boris said...

Matt,

If you have not already, I really believe you need to slow the cadence down. A 20+ rpm pace w. the 2 pood is going to put the hurt on most people's hands in a hurry unless they are really advanced. Slowing it down considerably, and maybe bumping the weight down as well, and being mindful of technique should make a difference.

matt said...

I did some practicing today. I feel like I still drag the handle across my palm as I bring it back down. I couldn't get the hang of catching it in the fingers.

Boris said...

Take things a rep at a time Matt. If, in a set of 5 reps for example, have 2 reps that don't pull on your hands, then that's something to build on.

MKSchinabeck said...

Boris,
Having been stuck in a snatch plateau with the 28kg for quite some time I have been slowly refining my technique. In my opinion, the catch has to be completed by eye level and no later than shoulder level or else the bell will pull your arm to the bottom of the descent and eventually lead to grip failure. Also, while playing with technique, one should really try to learn how to apply the finger lock, thumb over index finger, which is the true GS secret. Many talk about this, but not many can successfully do it on a consistent basis.....including myself.
The drop into the finger lock can be practiced from the clean rack, as in doing long cycle, and can also be practiced doing GS swings by regripping the bell with the finger lock during the weightless period of the bell at the top of each swing.
Hope these things help.......


Matt

MKSchinabeck said...

Oh yeah, tell your buddy Matt to not give up. GS technique is like a golf swing......there is ALWAYS something to work on!!! Your advice about dropping down in weight and slowing the rpms is dead on.

Boris said...

Thanks Matt. The finger lock, I get, but could you elaborate on 'completing the catch by eye/shoulder level' for me?

MKSchinabeck said...

Dennis mentions that the bell should be in the hook grip by mid chest level. From my experience that is too late. As you begin to fatigue, instead of getting into the hook or finger lock by mid chest level your hand won't be in position until waist level. Then, instead of having a nice pendulum effect as the bell swings behind you in the backswing, the bell is essentially falling straight down from the overhead position jerking your arm at the bottom leading to unnecessary grip fatigue and ultimately failure.

Does this make anymore sense?

Boris said...

Thank you!

I'll have to play with it to really 'get it'. I'll get back to you asap.