Sunday, August 23, 2009

Snatch Grip Romanian Deadlifts

An amazing exercise for the posterior chain - the Snatch Grip Romanian Deadlift:



Snatch grip Romanian deadlifts are one of those exercises that seem to slip out of the rotation and then, when they make it back in, you wonder why you ever stopped doing them.

13 comments:

Bryce said...

I just started using these to correct my poor hamstring mobility. They really are awesome.

Niel K. Patel said...

Great exercise if I could do them properly. Tried them for the first time a month or so ago, but I felt execution was poor (specifically grip & posture)

Doing regular Romanians right now, but hopefully I can do these right next time.

Sperwer said...

OK, I see the snatch grip, but otherwise don' see anyhing specifically "Romanian" about this - using Dan John's explanations of Romanian Deadlifts as a point of reference. Please elucidate.

Boris said...

Thanks Bryce and Niel.

Sperwer,
An RDL is not a stiff-legged deadlift. Drive the butt back as far as you can throughout the movement.
I'm not sure what definition of an RDL you're talking about but a quick Dan John google search gives me this - looks the same to me. http://danjohn.org/II1.pdf

Sperwer said...

Boris:

Thanks. I realize an RDL isn't a SLDL. And I think we're both looking at the same Dan John piece. I guess I was just misled by your superior flexibility in pushing out the cadboose AND getting the bar down past the tops of your socks compared with what I recall seeing in the Dan John stuff. :-)

matt said...

Great flexibility Boris!

Have you ever tried Dimel deadlifts? If so what did you think of them?

Boris said...

Thanks Sperwer.

Hi Matt - yes, I like Dimel DLs. If there was a choice of Dimel DLs or heavier KB swings, I'd probably take the KB option however.

Thomas said...

Thanks Boris, thanks for reminding us all.

Shawn said...

The important difference between a SLDL and a RDL -- and this comes from Rippetoe's "Starting Strength" -- is this:

The SLDL starts and ends with the weight on the floor; that is, like a standard deadlift, it starts with a concentric contraction.

The RDL starts and ends with the weight off the floor (that's why people sometimes use a rack for RDLs). So, like a squat, the RDL starts with an eccentric contract. RDLs, therefore, recruit the quads less than SLDLs and incorporate the same "bounce" at the bottom a squat does.

Boris said...

Go w. whatever definition you like. The essential difference (to me) is whether you are allowing the knees to bend as you lower (RDL) or not (stiff-legged). It's not something to get hung up on.

I often have to discuss my use of the terms "chins" and "pull-ups" as well - I use them interchangeably. Yes, I sometimes make a distinction between underhand and overhand as chins and pull-ups respectively. But, in the end, as I look over past training notes, etc. it doesn't really matter that much.

Bryce said...

Though I think it is good to occasionally vary grips and such to prevent overuse issues, I think dwelling on the minutia is a bit counter productive.

Not that having our terminology straight isn't a useful thing.

Anonymous said...

That's just a snatch grip deadlift. The RDL the legs don't bend much at all. Have them just unlocked, shove the hips back without letting the knees bend anymore that. The bar will move by the rotation in the hips with no assistance from the knees. You go as far as your flexibility allows. This differs from an SLDL in that the SLDL starts and ends on the floor, so it will have slightly more knee bend, but no stretch reflex. This guy isn't showing anything but a snatch'ish' grip deadlift (because his grip isn't exactly where a snatch would be, but that's being nit-picky) he doesn't have great flexibility, he's just bending his knees a lot, which. The whole point of an RDL is that they don't. Otherwise there is no need for them.

Bryce said...

Hah. Only four years late!